Old fashioned recipes: Seafood





_Codfish-Cakes._

Wash the fish, and after remaining in water all night, boil it. Take out all the bones, cut up very fine and mix with an equal quantity of potatoes; add a piece of butter, cayenne, and a little more salt, if necessary. Then make it out into small round cakes, and fry in butter or beef drippings, light brown on both sides.

_To Boil Lobsters._

The medium sized are best, put them alive into a kettle of boiling water which has been salted, and let them boil from half an hour to three- quarters, according to their size. When done take them out of the kettle, wipe them clean, and rub the shell with a little sweet oil, which will give a clear red appearance.

Crack the large claws without mashing them, and with a sharp knife split the body and tail from end to end. Send to table and dress as follows: after mincing it very fine add salt, cayenne pepper, mustard, salad oil, and vinegar to taste) observing to mix all well together.

_To Pickle Oysters,_

Drain off the liquor from one hundred oysters, wash them and put to them a table-spoonful of salt and a tea-cup of vinegar; let them simmer over the fire about ten minutes, taking off the scum as it rises; then take out the oysters and put to their own liquor a tablespoonful of whole black pepper and a teaspoonful of mace and cloves; let it boil five minutes, skim and pour it over the oysters in a jar.

_To Spice Oysters._

One hundred oysters, one dozen cloves, two dozen allspice, mace, cayenne pepper, and salt to taste.

Strain the liquor through a sieve, put it in a saucepan, and add the oysters, spice, pepper, salt, and half a pint of cider vinegar. Place them over a slow fire, and as soon as they boil take them off. Pour them into a large bowl and set them away to cool. When cold cover them close.

_Flounders--a la creme._

Scale, clean, and wrap your fish in a cloth, boil it gently in plenty of water well salted; when done drain it carefully without breaking, lay it on your dish and mask it with cream or white onion sauce.

_French Stew of Peas and Bacon._

Cut about one-quarter of a pound of fresh bacon into thin slices, soak it on the fire in a stewpan until it is almost done; then put about a quart of peas to it, a good bit of butter, a bunch of parsley, and two spoonfuls of catsup; simmer on a slow fire and reduce the sauce; take out the parsley and serve the rest together.

_New England Chowder._

Have a good haddock, cod, or any other solid fish; cut it in pieces three inches square, put a pound of fat salt pork in strips into the pot, set it on hot coals and fry out the oil; take out the pork and put in a layer of fish, over that a layer of onions in slices, then a layer of fish with slips of fat salt pork, then another layer of onions, and so on alternately until your fish is consumed; mix some flour with as much water as will fill the pot; season with black pepper and salt to your taste, and boil it for half an hour. Have ready some crackers (Philadelphia pilot bread if you can get it) soaked in water till they are a little softened; throw them into your chowder five minutes before you take it up. Serve in a tureen.

_Daniel Webster's Chowder._

Four tablespoonfuls of onions, fried with pork; a quart of boiled potatoes well mashed; 1 1/2 pounds of sea biscuit broken; 1 teaspoonful of thyme mixed with one of summer savory: 1/2 bottle of mushroom catsup; one bottle of port or claret; 1/4 of a nutmeg, grated; a few cloves, mace, and allspice; 6 pounds fish (sea-bass or cod), cut into slices; 25 oysters, a little black pepper, and a few slices of lemon. The whole put in a pot and covered with an inch of water, boiled for an hour and gently stirred.





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