Jack Russell Terrier - Canine Companion or Demon Dog (Chapter 3, p. 13)

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Chapter 3 : Page 13 of 36

Also consult Dr. Dodman's book The Dog Who Loved Too Much for behavioral issues. There are other good books, but the best way to find them if to take action and search them out. Also, I strongly suggest finding a trainer to evaluate the dog and your situation at home. Coming to your home and seeing firsthand what is going on is always a plus. Make sure the trainer is experienced with terriers and aggression. The wrong trainer can make a situation worse. For minor problems I suggest getting into an obedience class ASAP. It helps create a bond and also teaches the dog that you are in charge.

Nipping and biting is how a puppy explores its world and learns its boundaries. When you allow a puppy to nip or bite at you, or your clothes, without an appropriate correction or consequences, you are actually teaching this youngster that it is acceptable behavior. Not a good idea in the long run. Time outs work great for teaching the puppy that if they can't play nicely, they can't play at all. For puppies that bite there are two types of corrections that work well. It's not recommended discipline to be hitting a puppy or holding a puppy's mouth closed for biting. Instead put your hand over their muzzle and just push the lips into the teeth, if they exert pressure downward, they only end up biting themselves. This does two things; it gives them a correction, and simulates another dog putting its mouth over their muzzle. This mimics a common sign of dominance among canines, allowing you to reemphasize your dominance over them. You can also use a little pinch on the lip as a correction. With both corrections, give a verbal correction "No bite" and when they stop, praise them.

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