Communicating with God: One Person at a Time (Chapter 3, page 1 of 11)


Previous Page
Next Page

Chapter 3

The year and day of ordination was marked off from the start and acted as a sort of beacon towards which one aimed and its approach seemed to accelerate as the years went by. Some had a most romantic notion of the whole thing and really harboured the ambition to save the world once ordained. Some did look on it as a career, in a good sense, and spoke openly of having a large parish or even reaching the higher flights of the hierarchy. Some, the intellectuals, looked forward to further studies in Rome or Paris and quite openly saw themselves as returning to the seminary as professors. Most of us - and all tended to gather into like-minded groups in spite of all the phobia about 'particular friendships' - simply battled on to learn what we could, pass exams, keep our noses clean and looked on the day of ordination as a reward for six years effort.

What all did share was a practically total ignorance of what life would really be like 'out in the parish'. We all knew the theory of starting off as curates, we knew the sort of work to be done in parishes, we listened to horror stories of the cruelty of parish priests but did not really believe them. The expectations of priestly work were clear and seemed to be unchanging. We knew what would be expected of us in general terms, the jobs of curates, parish priests, chaplains; the whole idea of celibacy which was simply accepted as a necessary condition for ordination; the concept of obedience as accepting the job given by the Bishop etc. There was very little rumbling of discontent on important issues and no inkling in 1959 of the tremendous changes which would be unleashed on the Church by the Vatican Council and that the world outside was changing more and more rapidly in general.

Previous Page
Next Page


Rate This Book

Current Rating: 2.9/5 (433 votes cast)


Review This Book or Post a Comment