Communicating with God: One Person at a Time (Chapter 6, page 1 of 14)


Previous Page
Next Page

Chapter 6

Large though the subject of housekeepers looms in the annals of any parish and the memories of a simple curate at that time there were plenty of other things which are now all part of history. My only experience as a curate was in Corby which was generally acknowledged as being an important parish in the diocese. To begin with, the percentage of Catholics of the total population was way up in the 30% region due to the fact that whole extended families had come from the Glasgow area - true Scots by then but mostly of Irish extraction and, like the many Irish people themselves also there and still coming in, steeped in the traditional Faith of their fathers. It was a young population with marriages and baptisms far more common than funerals. Generally they were ardent in their belief and practice but pugnacious only on one day a year - July 12th.

Orange Day was not a day of civil disorder but friends and neighbours, co-workers, same club members and players in the same football teams marked the day by either marching ( if Orange) or scoffing ( if not). It shows the innocence and the lack of proper education dished out in the seminary that on the first July 12th of my priestly career, just as I was finishing mid-day Confessions, the sound of fife and drum brought me out in full cassock to stand in front of the church as a motley crew marched past - very slowly - with a brawny character beating hell out of a huge bass drum. This, apparently, was the symbolic 'kicking the Pope' ceremony and my goofy presence was very likely exacerbating the situation and could, according to the irate Parish Priest, have caused a riot. I was whisked out of sight and had the facts of life explained to me. Come July 13th and all was back to normal with Papists and Proddies co-existing peacefully in what was rapidly becoming a very special, unique community of 'Corbyites'.

Previous Page
Next Page


Rate This Book

Current Rating: 2.9/5 (433 votes cast)


Review This Book or Post a Comment