Communicating with God: One Person at a Time (Chapter 5, page 2 of 11)


Previous Page
Next Page

Chapter 5

All apparently logical arguments to the effect that just one collection at the door would bring in the same amount and save the bother of giving change were dismissed as having been disproved in practice in the past. Appeals to religion, the liturgy, the importance of prayer during Mass and the reverence due to the sacrament fell on even stonier ground since part of religion and prayer was, in fact, the commandment ' to contribute to the support of one's pastors' and thus the Church.

The collections were counted as they came in, still hot from the clutches of the donors. This was done by the priest not saying the Mass and in the old man's room according to a very structured manner with little piles of coins all over the place ready for a final count of the morning's takings before lunch. By then we would know the state of play and the amount would vary somewhat according to the weather or be drastically reduced in the tragic event that a curate was slow in closing the exit doors and some could have come in free rather than pay door money. A catastrophe which any curate would only have allowed to happen once in his career. When evening Mass was introduced this collection was counted before supper so that by Sunday night all was ready for the bank next morning.

Some consideration was given at one point to purchasing a money counting machine as used in banks. Priestly time and zeal, however, was considered far more efficient. Notes were very infrequent and the old pre-decimal coins, we found out, could be separated out with some accuracy by shaking them through a wire 'in-out' office tray so that the smaller coins dropped through and allowed for a certain facility in dealing with the various coins. The highlight of one Sunday count was the finding of a half sovereign - which was promptly reclaimed by an old lady who had put it in by mistake for a farthing - and had the temerity to ring up and tell us so - and then come personally to collect it.

Previous Page
Next Page


Rate This Book

Current Rating: 2.9/5 (433 votes cast)


Review This Book or Post a Comment