Blues Then and Now - The History of the Blues (Chapter 8, p. 2)

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Chapter 8 : Page 2 of 8

Walter 'Fury' Lewis was a regular performer on Beale Street and would play with W.C. Handy's band whenever they were in town. Aleck `Rice' Miller, 'Sonny Boy' Williamson was the leader of the house band for the "King Biscuit Time" radio show on station KFFA in Memphis. His personnel included Robert Junior Lockwood on guitar, James 'Peck' Curtis on drums, pianist Joe 'Pine Top' Perkins and 'Sonny Boy playing the harmonica.

The jug bands found a home in Memphis and especially on Beale Street where they would perform at clubs, juke joints, picnics, on the street corners, in the city parks, and other ventures. Musicians that were associated with jug bands were Allen Shaw, Little Boy Doyle, Kaiser Clifton and James DeBerry and much more. Memphis however, was a stopover for musicians traveling north from the Deep South. When the "Jazz Age" began in 1920, blacks had already begun their exodus from the south to what they considered to be their "Promise Land" up north. Any place was better than the south for the Negro. The black population grew up in cities like Chicago, Detroit, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Newark and New York. They brought with them the music of the classic blues singers, the country blues, rural blues and the down home blues.

Northern white singers and musicians were picking up on the authentic black blues music. As a matter of fact, it was Blind Lemon Jefferson who had the most influence with the white man's blues. More and more northern nightclubs and cabarets were hearing the true blues as performed by the black artists.

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