The Great Chain on Urantia (Preface, page 2 of 4)


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Bhutan is unique among the member nations of the UN, in having declared the Yeti its official animal, issuing a series of postage stamps commemorating that creature to illustrate the fact. One of them shows a woman being carried off by a Yeti.

It is speculated the Yeti, or Yeh-Teh, and its variants, the Meh-Teh or Mi-Go, and the Almas, all varieties of the notorious Abominable Snowman, though known mostly from tracks in the Himalayan snows, normally inhabit rain forests, as do its North American cousins, the Sasquatch and Bigfoot. It is thought the wanderings in the mountaintops might have to do with the vitamin rich lichens on the rocks.

The community of Paro, elevation 7700 feet, sits on the banks of a tributary of the Wong Chhu, and is situated midway between the northern border with Tibet and the southern border with India, both being around forty miles distant.

The capital, Thimphu, lies to the east of Paro, again about forty miles away. Each of these population centers are in the western part of Bhutan, close to the border with the older and even smaller Sikkim, another Himalayan kingdom that was closely tied to India at the time of this narrative.

In 1940 there are no roads in Bhutan. The population of this small country at this time is around seven hundred thousand. The capital is Punakha for most of the year, ceding the privilege to higher and cooler Thimphu forty miles west, in the summer.

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