The Great Chain on Urantia (Chapter 3, page 2 of 4)


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Chapter 3

Brother Andre takes his bundle to the kitchen. A portly monk, classic caricature, with a dark head-band of hair accentuating an otherwise bald head, is standing by the counter, frowning at a bowl.

"Well Brother Rudolph, how fare you this morning? Do you have the baby's breakfast ready? You do. Good. So let me see you feed the baby. Now don't fuss. Just feed the baby."

"But Brother Andre, we have no nipple! How can the baby drink this without a nipple to suck it up?"

"Mmm, yes, let me see. Ah. We have some nipples, we certainly do. There's some rubber gloves in the storage room. Cut the little finger off a glove, turn it inside out, make a little hole in the end, and stretch it onto a bottle of this wonderful baby breakfast. That should work just fine, alright? I must go to chapel now to lead mid-morning prayer. When the baby is fed, find some suitable cloths and see if a change of habit is in order. Diapers, yes, replace the baby's diaper with a clean cloth. Then come to prayer. We will understand if you're a bit late."

In the chapel some fifty lay brothers are at prayer. They finish with a sonorous chant. 'Per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum Filium tuum….' Brother Andre addresses the group.

"Brothers in the Lord. This morning we were blessed with a special visit; a newborn baby was brought to us. It was left at the gate, as if by an angel. And so far, we have no way of knowing who brought it here.

We must consider this a trial. A test of our worthiness as Lay Brothers of Jesus.

We instructed Brother Rudolph to care for the baby before joining us here. I do not see him among us; we must presume he has had some difficulty. In any case, you are to know we have a new young life in our midst.

Unless and until we find who brought it here, we must adopt this little one. If any of you are asked to take part in this task you will do so with your customary diligence and care, and without question.

Now, if there is one among you who may be more suited than the others, either by experience or interest, to care for this little creature personally, please come and speak to me before our evening meal. In the meantime, Brother Boniface, will you choose a companion to go to Sombe with you to acquire the necessary supplies. Come and see me when you're ready to leave.

Brothers one and all, may God be with you."

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