Jones of Old Lincoln (Chapter 3, page 2 of 10)


Previous Page
Next Page

Chapter 3

"Father had dealings early on with the Dickson brothers of Fayetteville. He'd bought necessities at their store and harness from their saddlery. His fine Sunday saddle from the Dickson saddlery was a prized possession. Brother Will would let me tag along on visits to Fayetteville when he was sent on father's business. Once when father needed something for the harness or a repair of something along that line, Will was sent on the errand. I went along. I was maybe twelve years of age.

"The tanning yard and saddlery were fascinating to me as I sat while a big, muscled slave, a truly enormous black man, Cyrus, helped Mr. Robert go about the repair. For the next few years, whenever I got a chance, I was along Tan Yard Branch at the Dickson's place of business, watching and listening. The Dicksons were very active in the affairs of the growing town and county, especially Mr. Robert. I overheard all sorts of news, comments, and opinions. You might say I acquired my political "bug" by being a fly on the wall at a smelly, cluttered, busy, frontier tanning yard and saddle shop." He smiled at his witty insect imagery.

"On one of my visits, one Saturday in January 1818, the great Andrew Jackson came by the Dickson store. He was a long, lathy, rawboned man who looked mighty peaked. He wore a fine buff and blue general's uniform trimmed in bright gold braid and was astride a huge, magnificent, restless, gray stallion.

Previous Page
Next Page


Rate This Book

Current Rating: 2.6/5 (263 votes cast)



Review This Book or Post a Comment