The First Book of Iaddius Ioahann (Chapter 2, page 1 of 6)


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Chapter 2

"It is of the greatest importance to search out our own beginnings - the beginnings of this great Iohannin line. For it is quite impossible, I assure you, to appreciate ourselves and our own abilities without regard for those who have come before us. Indeed we live in a strange time in which the heroes and great men of the past are nigh forgotten. But let us not forget! Let us lift up the eyes of our understanding and allow the memories of our blood to flow through our minds to the awakening thereof, and through our hearts to the enlightenment thereof. With somber sentiment, and as your King on earth, I plead with you to search your progenitors and see if you cannot find yourself among them." - From the Final Address of King Andrew Ciadda. My name is Iaddius Iohann. I am the first son of Ishmael and Leah Iohann and am a native of the Khenochian City State. As such, the lands of my youth were the great mountains of the north, called by us Teaw Kipes-eth, which is "the land of white peaks". I lived in that region for the majority of my early years with my mother and father and two younger brothers. Our existence was a pleasant one. The elders of Khenochia were diligent in their work to protect the strictest of orders as had been established by our fathers. Learning and culture were in abundance. The arts were practiced with great precision, architecture and engineering had become highly advanced, and our economic systems promoted the highest level of equity and stability. Our conditions were ever favorable and seldom arose any manner of contention.

Despite the cheeriness of my country, I found it prudent, at the age of seventeen to solicit my father for the freedom to travel south beyond our borders. This I did greatly desiring to see what lay beyond our golden gates and marble pillars. I wished to see the land of trees, the land of sand and sea! My father objected stubbornly for nine months until at last I was successful in convincing him to consult with the elders. I truly felt that the elders would allow it. Although it was not customary for them to promote the leaving of the territory, I felt that they may consent to me. They had called and elected me to be trained as a judge in the city. My appeal to them was that if I were allowed to travel it would enhance my ability to judge with equity and without bias or prejudice.

And so it was that my father went before them and delivered his plight into their hands. I do not know what conversations and debates transpired between them, but it was not until many weeks later that they delivered their position to my father. They spoke to him in council and told him that if he were agreeable to the idea of my leaving (for never would they interfere with a father's right to raise and treat his children - it was against their laws) then they would allow it. Nevertheless, they also suggested that I be allowed to leave on the condition that I return within a year's time to begin my formal training and that after I return I abandon the entertainment of further fantasies of leaving.

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