Muse Power: How Recreational Music Making Heals Depression and Other Symptoms of Modern Culture (Chapter 3, page 1 of 10)


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Chapter 3

"Folk music is like an un-weeded bio-reserve. Who can deny its down-to-earth robustness, the verve, vigor or vitality which is closer to nature and presented in a more truthful manner than modern music." Author Unknown

Music is such a vast human experience with so many aspects to be considered. Saying music is a universal language is true, and yet different forms of music evoke different responses in us, and each form has in effect it's own "dialect" or "tongue." So, in essence, it's just like our world, we all can experience the "Human" experience, but each culture has it's own expression of that and it's own unique manifestations of life depending on a variety of factors. These factors include, but are not limited to social, economic, environmental, ancestral, and traditional. I see music very much like I see the many cultures of this planet: all are intrinsically valuable and have something to teach us, all have a place and a time of their own, and all forms of music offer something unique and irreplaceable as expressions of life and the greater cosmic creation we are a part of.

In primitive traditional cultures, there were members of the tribe who specialized in carrying the music forth, yet it is also true that everyone participated in the experience. It was their job to maintain the oral traditions, songs, dances and stories of their people, WITH their people. In Africa, the term "Griot" is still used today. A griot is a praise singer, a wandering musician, considered a repository of oral tradition. Griots are an ancestoral responsibility that follows a blood line to ensure the survival of the music in a pure form. In other traditions, in the Celtic world, the term "bard" was used, or "minstrel." In India, the "udgatr" was the chanter of melodies, in Ancient Greece, in the fifth and fourth centuries BC and perhaps earlier, a "rhapsode" was a professional performer of poetry, the "sage" had a similar role as did the "Mystic" and the "Muse." These were the closest things to what we now consider "Professionals" in the Muse Arts: music, dance, poetry, storytelling, etc.

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