Muse Power: How Recreational Music Making Heals Depression and Other Symptoms of Modern Culture (Introduction, page 2 of 10)


Previous Page
Next Page

Looking at this gathering, from the outside, deep in the heart of the woods, fire blazing, drums resounding, spirit songs emerging from wailing hearts, it might be hard to tell when or where in time you are. The familiarity of it is inexplicable, yet profound, primal and somehow undeniably intriguing. It could be in Africa somewhere or a ceremony in North America before the Europeans came, or it could be a modern tribe somewhere in the United States, which indeed it is.

Out of this space, one young woman steps forward into the center of the circle, close to the fire. She is in her early 20's and she is flanked by two other women who are holding space for her, energetically supporting her. She is silently acknowledged by all present and begins to speak. The singing voices continue on, but intuitively all the singers bring the volume down so that this young woman's voice can be heard clearly.

"I come before you tonight," says the young woman, dressed all in white with her head held high, "to tell a story of a girl I knew. She was lost in this world, she felt no connection to her family or to the kids at school, and she felt life had no purpose as everything she saw around her seemed to only offer hope of an isolated existence, another cog in the wheel of the machine. In her confusion, in her loneliness and despair, she became depressed and angry at the world for being so screwed up, for offering so little that has substance. Kids at school were doing drugs, and she wanted to fit in. It seemed like a place she could escape reality at least. That was how she became a heroin addict, 5 years ago."

Previous Page
Next Page


Rate This Book

Current Rating: 2.7/5 (308 votes cast)



Review This Book or Post a Comment