Nichoatra, The Love He Could Not Keep (Chapter 2 - Nicky (The Meeting Part 2), page 1 of 10)


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I was exhausted, and as I got ready for bed that day, I hoped the next one would be better. My day had started out with an international phone call to Liberia, and it had ended up in a business communications class that seemed never-ending. The instructor was long-winded, as usual, and it was hard to concentrate on school because my thoughts kept drifting back to the phone call. I was elated when the three-hour class finally ended.

For the past five years, I had been trying to purchase a piece of property-about three hundred acres of forestland-in Liberia, my home country. When my father first told me about the land deal in 2006, I thought it sounded like a great opportunity. I sent him two thousand dollars, which I felt would be more than enough, since he had told me it would cost only five hundred dollars to purchase and survey the property. In 2007 I traveled to Liberia to see the property for myself. To my surprise, there was no property to see-my father had invested my money in some scam and lost it all. And he never told me he had lost the money. I found out the hard way.

Ultimately I ended up spending more than five thousand dollars for a piece of forestland that should have cost a tenth of that-and still I owned nothing! Worse yet, I was scammed by the person I trusted most, my own father. Needless to say, I was angry and hurt. Still, I wanted to own property in Liberia and build a farm there. A farm would provide food and employment for people in the surrounding towns, and it also would provide a steady income for my parents.

Before I returned to the US from Liberia in 2007, my father had sworn to me that he had paid six hundred dollars to the town's chief, who owned the property and had agreed to sell it. My father told me that he still owed a balance of five hundred dollars. Because he is my father, and because I sympathized with the fact that he and my mother were still living in Liberia after its long civil war, I took him at his word and left Liberia with the intention of sending the remaining five hundred dollars. This time, however, I would send the money to my mother, who would handle my affairs there moving forward.

My parents had been divorced for more than thirty years and lived in separate towns in Liberia. When we were children, my siblings and I were brought to the United States by our paternal grandmother. Over the years, we provided as much financial support as we could to our parents in Liberia. But my goal was to help my parents become financially independent. The farm would give them that independence and alleviate some of our financial burden in the long term.

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